AJF Visits Estonia and Sweden

All in all, it was a wonderful trip. While the time in Estonia was busy and full, the Swedish portion was faster paced. But the week provided us a wonderful overview of jewelry being made in that “cool corner” of the world, and introduced us to many of the artists whom we had previously only known through their work.

Benedikt Fischer

Jeweler’sWerk Galerie, Washington DC, USA

Adornment was never something I had predominately on my mind when doing my work. Of course it is undeniable that jewelry has this adornment quality, and I think for me a good piece of jewelry has to be both alluring and as well made as possible. The content, its allure, and the making must go together for me; otherwise, a piece of jewelry cannot reach any real moment of adornment. I believe one can have content in one’s work and at the same time still care about the visual aspects of it.

Against Criticism: Seven Variations on an Unpleasant Theme, part 2

Criticality nº7

This summer we published a five-part series on criticality, as part of a partnership with Klimt02. The essays all embraced the idea that criticality is a good thing, and that criticism is a necessary compost for the growth of contemporary craft. Hence my excitement when Pravu Mazumdar agreed to develop his own thoughts on the role of the critique. This is the second part of Pravu’s essay, in which he focuses on the critical writing of Bruce Metcalf.

Caroline Gore: …mercurial silence…

Velvet da Vinci, San Francisco, California, USA

Memorializing tragic events through leaving objects and ephemera at sites of violence and tragedy is now pervasive. In doing so we attempt to process what has happened, honor victims, and give some physical form to loss. However, this was not the case 30 years ago—we tended to walk away from the actual site and perhaps more directly toward one another.

Wear It Loud: Curated by Platforma (Bella Neyman and Ruta Reifen)

R|R Gallery, New York, New York, USA

Platforma’s mission is to expand the audience and collecting base for contemporary jewelry through alternative outlets. Here, our strategy was to utilize a conventional white-walled gallery space with a simple display to play up the “loud” aspect of the jewelry. We wanted the work—not the display—to drive the conversation, although it was beautiful. Working with a gallery in such a central location allowed accessibility to a diverse audience that is new to this subject. 

Against Criticism: Seven Variations on an Unpleasant Theme, part 1

Criticality nº6

Over the month of August we published a five-part series on criticality, as part of a partnership with Klimt02, under the label “the AJF feed.” The five essays, although diverse, all embraced the idea that criticality is a good thing, and that criticism is a necessary compost for the growth of contemporary craft. Hence my excitement when Pravu Mazumdar agreed to develop his own thoughts on the role of the critique in a two-part essay titled Against Criticism

Precious Stones, Bones, Plastic and Trash: 40 Years of New Zealand Jewelry

The use of stone, bone, and shell has a long history in New Zealand. These materials talk to Maori and indigenous practice. Even when these are used in contemporary ways, people here still understand the connection these materials have to Aotearoa New Zealand. Jewelry here has also been heavily influenced by Pacific adornment, with the use of coconut and tortoise shell and production methods. We’re all very proud of our connection to the ocean and the flora of this place, which is also heavily referenced. 

Digital Artisans: The Future of Design and Creation

In Conversation with Alba Cappellieri

Jewelry exists in an area between art, artisanship, fashion, and design. It encompasses, sometimes dissonantly, the most unbridled luxury and the most avant-garde conceptualism. It takes the authorship of art and combines it with the ephemeral nature of fashion, using precious materials to achieve the protective authority of eternity.

Sophie Hanagarth’s Breast—Drop

One on One nº10

If the picture lets you see the brooch, in order to understand the minuscule details that make it what it is, you’ll need to take hold of it, caress it, twirl an excessively pointy nipple that sometimes scrapes and jams, and gives hollow sounds, neither tender nor soft, like something obstinate, stiff, and austere. 

Bettina Speckner: Foto-jóias

Galeria Thomas Cohn, São Paulo, Brazil

My way of seeing is maybe with a painter’s eye—my jewelry pieces rarely are three-dimensional, and everything happens on a two-dimensional surface. Maybe even my use of imagery comes from there. It gives me the possibility to play.

From the Forum

Graduate Portfolio

Chen, MA 2014

Graduate Portfolio

Clooney, MA 2014

Graduate Portfolio

Gu, MA 2014

Graduate Portfolio

Hu, MA 2014

Graduate Portfolio

Li, MA 2014

Graduate Portfolio

Ronsholt Smith, MA 2014

Graduate Portfolio

Tsai, MA 2014

Graduate Portfolio

Yang, MA 2014